RSS

Using LaTeX with Microsoft Word

20 Mar

In grad school I wrote as much as I could in LaTeX, including my Ph.D. thesis. This offered several advantages, the largest being that it enabled me to script the generation of very large tables (50+ pages) automatically. If I made a change to my project that affected the output of said tables, all I had to do was rerun the script that generated those tables and my thesis would be updated.

The biggest drawback was that occasionally I have to submit manuscripts to publishers who either will not accept LaTeX submissions, or who seem to go out of their way to make submitting in LaTeX extremely difficult.  Similarly, sharing documents with collaborators in LaTeX can be frustrating.  Sure, you can send the PDF, or maybe they are even comfortable editing the LaTeX directly (rare in my experience), but I have yet to see an end-to-end procedure for tracking changes made by peers in a PDF or LaTeX document that makes it easy for me to accept or reject the changes.

There are a few tools available that can help make converting your LaTeX projects into Word format a few steps better than retyping your whole thesis (though it’s still pretty painful!):

  1. LaTeX2rtf will help you convert your LaTeX document to a Rich Text Format (RTF) file that can be opened in Word.  This will leave you with a lot of formatting fixes to implement, particularly for any tables, figures, equations, etc., but I find it’s better than having to start from scratch.
  2. Bibtex4Word can format your entire bibliography in Word using Bibtex bibliography files as the reference source.  This means you can use all those old .bib files you’ve created for LaTeX in word documents!  I find the particularly useful if I know I need to use Word for a project but I don’t want to have access to RefMan or EndNote.  I also recommend JabRef for managing BibTex files.

Recently I’ve been struggling to format a paper for Nature Molecular Systems Biology.  They accept LaTeX submissions, but for ease of sharing my manuscript with my collaborators I decided to write it in Word.  Unfortunately Nature does not provide a BibTex style file for Nature MSB, so in order to use Bibtex4Word I was forced to make my own using makebst.tex.  Luckily, the Endoplasmic Reticulum blog documented their struggle with making a BST file for Nature MSB and I was able to make a BST file without too much trouble.  Note, however, that to use this BST with Bibtex4Word you’ll need to make use of some style flags.

I should clarify that this is all a terribly convoluted process and there are definetely bugs you’ll encounter along the way.  If you want the simplest end to end solution, invest your time and resources in a solution that’s specific to Word, or specific to LaTeX.

About these ads
 
1 Comment

Posted by on March 20, 2011 in Alchemy

 

Tags: , , , , , , ,

One response to “Using LaTeX with Microsoft Word

  1. weirleader

    March 22, 2011 at 12:16 pm

    I absolutely love LaTeX, but after reading this post I’m glad I haven’t had to collaborate on long articles before. I actually just use it to write math documents — handouts, quizzes, tests.

    Still, it’s interesting to know that it can be manipulated to work with Word.

     

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

 
Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

%d bloggers like this: